FOLLOW US >


An All-American Log Home Roundup

From Atlantic to Pacific and the lands in between, Log Home Living salutes the all-American log home.

There’s no type of housing that’s more closely connected with the United States than the log cabin. Log cabin homes were among the first built by the brave pilgrims and the pioneering settlers of the western frontier, and log homes continue to be highly sought-after by creative homeowners who want their homes to stand apart from the rest.

From Atlantic to Pacific and the lands in between, Log Home Living salutes the all-American log home. 

Hochstetler Milling2,525 sq. ft.

Like the rest of this brand new 2,525-square-foot home, the front porch is intended to look as though it's been around for generations. The square, white pine logs with a hand-hewn, dovetailed profile are finished with a weathered-gray stain.

Read the full story.


MossCreek Designs - 5,900 sq. ft.

Historic Gettysburg is the site of this all-American log home. Surrounded by the memorials and epitaphs of the Civil War, the homestead is a gentler reminder of the heritage of the early years of the United States.

Read the full story.

 

The North Carolina mountaintop on which this classic log cabin is perched provides cool breezes that keep America’s colors flying high. 


Real Log Homes/Meeker Builders - 2,691 sq. ft.

Western expansion of the U.S. brought distinct housing styles of its own. This California cutie has a Craftsman-industrial vibe (with hints of Mission style). The log home’s long, low profile harmonizes with its Sierra Nevada mountain locale, rather than compete with it. And at 2,691square feet, its size is comfortable but manageable.

Read the full story. 


Log home interiors are no stranger to American inspiration. This cozy bedroom is a star-spangled tribute from the built-in window seat to the bedding and accents.


Montana Timber Structures - 900 sq. ft.

The tiny log cabin in Colorado is low to the ground and snuggled among the pines and aspen — a humble lookout post facing the Continental Divide on the horizon, with a classic Wild West ghost town just one mile away. A bleaching stain on the exterior weathers the logs to a natural gray shade. The blue standing seam metal roof nearly disappears into the sky.

Read the full story.